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Genuine Leather Baby Toddler Moccasins - Black/Red

$ 26.00

Genuine Leather Baby Toddler Moccasins - Black/Red

$ 26.00

2-tone design.
Smooth Italian Leather
Beautiful design, amazing quality.
Elastic Opening To Easily Put On And Take Off
Durable Leather Sole
Fringe All-Around Design
They are super comfortable and look super cute on your little one's feet

Sizes:

0-3 Months - 4.5 Inches
3-6 Months - 5 Inches
6-12 Months - 5.25 Inches
18-24 Months - 6 Inches

View the video of our baby moccasins here: https://youtu.be/ZNlEFIY_Y-Y

Looking for a gift bag? Check out this jute string pouch: http://etsy.me/1ZXmT3i

Doctors recommend babies to wear soft-soled shoes until the age of two. Soft-soled shoes allow your little one's feet to develop naturally, improving balance and enhancing the muscle development.

Hard, restrictive shoes might affect foot development in babies. Some parents feel hard, supportive shoes increase a baby's ankle strength, but according to Dr. Elizabeth Berger in "Parents" magazine, no evidence exists that shoes strengthen the ankles. All of the wiggling, kicking and other movements your baby does with his feet help him develop the foot muscles that he needs for walking. Tight, hard-soled shoes limit the amount of movement in your child's feet. Soft-soled shoes with plenty of space in them allow your baby to move his feet to avoid interruptions in development. (source: livestrong.com)

Tracy Byrne, a podiatrist specialising in podopaediatrics, believes that wearing shoes at too young an age can hamper a child's walking and cerebral development. "Toddlers keep their heads up more when they are walking barefoot," she says. "The feedback they get from the ground means there is less need to look down, which is what puts them off balance and causes them to fall down." Walking barefoot, she continues, develops the muscles and ligaments of the foot, increases the strength of the foot's arch, improves proprioception (our awareness of where we are in relation to the space around us) and contributes to good posture. (source: theguardian.com)